When Taking a Chance Pays Off

When I cover a professional football games, there's usually a second photographer I work with. We work as a team to provide Getty Images with the best coverage of the day from multiple angles.

Late in yesterday's game, the New York Jets tied the Minnesota Vikings. The game was headed to overtime. I texted the other photographer to inform him I would stay in behind the Jets if he would stay behind the Vikings. We would be on opposite quadrants of the field. The hope was if there was an interception or break away play, one of us would be in the right place at the right time. 50/50 chance to make THE image.

I sat in the end zone along the Vikings bench sideline and waited and waited. Long enough to start to second guess myself. Then Vikings quarterback Teddy Bridgewater found Jarius Wright. 87 yards later the game was over.

Hannah Foslien/Getty Images

Hannah Foslien/Getty Images

While I waited, I thought about what lens should be on my second camera body. Do I go with the safe mid-range 70-200mm? or do I take a risk and go wider with the 28-70mm?

Hannah Foslien/Getty Images

Hannah Foslien/Getty Images

I went wide. I took a risk setting up away from the action. If that paid off, I would need a wide. If it didn't pay off, I would need a wide to run out for the hand shakes after the game.

Without having the 70-200mm on a camera, the image I missed was Wright actually crossing into the end zone. Would that have added anything to the story I told with these images? Probably not.